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Ohio Pharmacy Board backs off hydroxychloroquine ban

This Tuesday, April 7, 2020 file photo shows a bottle of hydroxychloroquine tablets in Texas City, Texas. Results published Wednesday, June 3, 2020, by the New England Journal of Medicine show that hydroxychloroquine was no better than placebo pills at preventing illness from the COVID-19 coronavirus. The drug did not seem to cause serious harm, though - about 40% on it had side effects, mostly mild stomach problems. (Source: AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
This Tuesday, April 7, 2020 file photo shows a bottle of hydroxychloroquine tablets in Texas City, Texas. Results published Wednesday, June 3, 2020, by the New England Journal of Medicine show that hydroxychloroquine was no better than placebo pills at preventing illness from the COVID-19 coronavirus. The drug did not seem to cause serious harm, though - about 40% on it had side effects, mostly mild stomach problems. (Source: AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Published: Jul. 30, 2020 at 2:17 PM EDT
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TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) - A long-utilized drug that has become a partisan issue in the effort to treat COVID-19 infections escaped from being banned for that purpose after the Ohio Pharmacy reversed course Thursday.

The oversight organization had initially announced that chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine would be prohibited for treatment of the novel coronavirus.

According to their statement retracting the rule change, the board said feedback from the medical and patient communities, as well as Governor Mike DeWine, led them to withdraw the proposed rule.

As a result of the feedback received by the medical and patient community and at the request of Governor DeWine, the State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy has withdrawn proposed rule 4729:5-5-21 of the Administrative Code. Therefore, prohibitions on the prescribing of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in Ohio for the treatment of COVID-19 will not take effect at this time. This will allow the Board to reexamine the issue with the assistance of the State Medical Board of Ohio, clinical experts, and other stakeholders to determine appropriate next steps. Licensees should be aware that emergency rule 4729-5-30.2 is no longer effective and the requirements of that rule, including the inclusion of a diagnosis code on any prescription for chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, are no longer applicable.

State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy

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