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Summer Safety Series: Protecting your pets from the summer heat

The Toledo Humane Society advises against over-exposure and leaving your animals unattended in the heat
The Toledo Humane Society advises against over-exposure and leaving your animals unattended in...
The Toledo Humane Society advises against over-exposure and leaving your animals unattended in the heat.(Ashley Bornancin)
Updated: Jun. 18, 2021 at 6:06 AM EDT
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TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) - With the scorching hot temperatures, it’s important that we keep a close eye on our furry friends to protect them from any possible heat exposure.

The Toledo Humane Society advises keeping an eye on your pets when outside. Find a shaded area for them as well as plenty of water and do not leave them outside for an extended period of time. Heat can be a major stressor on our animals, especially our senior friends and young ones.

Before you go on a walk, be sure to do the “asphalt test.”

“So the asphalt test is when you can put your hand on the asphalt before you take your dog for a walk. We typically say count to 10-20 seconds and if your hands start to burn during that time, then it’s too hot for your pet, so look for the evening hours when the cement is cooler,” said Abbey Hall, Development Manager at the Toledo Humane Society.

They say under no condition should you leave your pets in your car while running errands. Instead, keep them at home to sure their safety. If you have to run errands with your pet, find effective ways to multitask without leaving them unattended in the car, like ordering ahead for grocery pick-ups.

Leaving the window down, air conditioning on, and giving them water is still not effective enough to protect your pet from being overexposed to the heat, and the animal can die within minutes.

“No matter what, you have to consider that when your animal is inside a car, it’s going to be pretty much double or triple the heat of what it would be in the actual temperature outside. So if it’s 80 degrees outside it can easily within a matter of probably 10 minutes get to be 160 degrees in your car. It’s almost like an oven,” says Hall.

If you do see an animal trapped in a vehicle, the Toledo Humane Society advises you to call 911 immediately. If you see an animal in distress outside, you can file a complaint on their website, toledohumane.org, or you can call their cruelty hotline, 419-891-9777.

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