Monroe County teen dies after family fights to keep him on life support

Ann Arbor, Mich. (WTVG) - A Monroe County teen has been pronounced dead as his family fought to keep him on life support.

According to the family of Bobby Reyes,14, he went into cardiac arrest after an asthma attack that happened in September.

He was take to Mott Children's Hospital in Ann Arbor. A hospital spokeswoman told 13abc he showed no detectable brain activity, no electrical activity and no blood flow to the brain.

His family wanted Reyes to be transported to another facility. The family went to court Tuesday to prevent the hospital from doing a second scan before making a death declaration. A judge in Washtenaw County dismissed the case saying he did not have jurisdiction.

In a statement Tuesday afternoon, Mott officials say after a second brain death examination was done, Reyes was pronounced dead.

TUESDAY STATEMENT FROM MOTT CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL AND MICHIGAN MEDICINE:

Our health care team at Michigan Medicine extends our deepest condolences to the family of Bobby Reyes in this heartbreaking situation.

A second brain death examination was conducted late this morning, and Bobby was pronounced dead. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued after the family gathered in the patient’s room.

The brain death examination showed Bobby had no detectable brain or brain stem function. Further testing -- including an electrical encephalogram (EEG) and a cerebral blood flow study -- detected no electrical activity and no blood flow to Bobby’s brain.

By law in Michigan, an individual is dead who has sustained either irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions or irreversible cessation of all function of the entire brain, including the brain stem.

Continuing medical interventions was inappropriate after Bobby had suffered brain death and violates the professional integrity of Michigan Medicine’s clinicians.

His caregivers at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital have diligently worked with the family to help arrange to transfer Bobby to another facility, contacting more than 20 different facilities. Every facility contacted declined to take on Bobby’s care.

Our team at Michigan Medicine sympathizes with the Reyes family and is committed to providing support in this difficult time.

MONDAY STATEMENT FROM MOTT CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL AND MICHIGAN MEDICINE

Our health care team at Michigan Medicine empathizes with the family of Bobby Reyes, who are facing an extremely difficult and heartbreaking situation.

Tragically, testing has showed that Bobby has no detectable brain activity. An initial brain death examination on Sept. 24 showed Bobby had no detectable brain or brain stem function. Further testing -- including an electrical encephalogram (EEG) and a cerebral blood flow study -- detected no electrical activity and no blood flow to Bobby's brain.

Michigan Medicine needs to proceed with a second examination to confirm there is irreversible cessation of all functions, including the brain stem. Michigan Medicine has not proceeded with the second examination because the family sought relief in court, and a hearing is planned for Tuesday.

By law in Michigan, an individual is dead who has sustained either irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions or irreversible cessation of all function of the entire brain, including the brain stem.

The present situation of continuing medical interventions is inappropriate if Bobby has suffered brain death and violates the professional integrity of Michigan Medicine's clinicians.

His caregivers at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital have diligently worked with the family to help arrange to transfer Bobby to another facility, but every facility contacted has declined to take on Bobby's care.

Our team at Michigan Medicine sympathizes with the Reyes family and is committed to providing support in this difficult time.