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Staying away from red meat and alcohol could help prevent cancer

Florida is among the worst in the nation when it comes to preventing cancer, receiving subpar scores in all eight categories measured in a new report by the American Cancer Society. (Carissa Rogers / CC BY 2.0)
Florida is among the worst in the nation when it comes to preventing cancer, receiving subpar scores in all eight categories measured in a new report by the American Cancer Society. (Carissa Rogers / CC BY 2.0)(WJHG)
Published: Jun. 9, 2020 at 3:50 PM EDT
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The American Cancer Society has updated its guidelines for cancer prevention when it comes to diet and physical activity for the first time since 2012. Diet and exercise are two key components in many cancer cases.

While some of the information is familiar to many of us, it is worth repeating. The guidelines are aimed at helping reduce your lifetime risk of developing or dying from cancer.

Dr. Suketu Patel is a Radiation Oncologist at Mercy Health's Perrysburg Cancer Center. "Aside from smoking, a sedentary lifestyle and diet are key components in cancer. They contribute to nearly 20% of cancer cases. We're seeing a lot of cases with no family history. And sometimes they are lifestyle related," said Dr. Patel.

The list of guidelines includes getting 150-300 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a week for adults. Getting 300 minutes or more will give you the most health benefits.

Children and teens should get at least an hour of moderate or vigorous-intensity activity each day.

Spend less time sitting or lying down. That includes looking at your phone, computer, tablet or TV.

Develop and maintain healthy eating habits.. Everyone is encouraged to maintain a healthy weight, and eat more fruits and vegetables. You should also limit or eliminate red meat, processed meats and highly processed foods. The guidelines also say you should eliminate or limit alcohol consumption.

The Victory Center is a critical resource for cancer patients in this community. Unfortunately, the need for this organization increases every year. Dianne Barndt is the Executive Director. The center helps hundreds of patients, survivors and their families every year. All of the services offered at the center are free to men, women and children with any kind of cancer.

"The American Cancer Society recommendations are going to make you feel better first of all. Second of all, if you could reduce your risk by even 5%, you should do it," said Barndt.

We've posted links to The Victory Center and the American Cancer Society.

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